Articles by Dom Sinacola

Breaking: Demetrius Shipp Jr.

All eyes are on the first-time actor who was born to play the part of Tupac Shakur.

The Weeknd, “Starboy”

“Starboy” is rapt with the same sad-sack bullshit, asinine stabs at humility, and total lack of self-awareness that has plagued The Weeknd since his first tape.

D.R.A.M., “Big Baby D.R.A.M.”

To love “Big Baby D.R.A.M.” is not the same as thinking it’s actually any good.

NxWorries, “Yes Lawd!”

Spending fifty minutes rubbing up against this, Knxwledge and Anderson .Paak’s lavish debut tape as NxWorries, is to luxuriate in smoothness as an end unto itself.

Atmosphere, “Fishing Blues”

Hyper-awareness and gnarled wordplay—that which defined Atmosphere and its ilk’s brand of hip-hop—is now, on the duo’s seventh studio LP, that which makes it merely fine.

YG, “Still Brazy”

The Compton rapper’s new album is several shades of moral gray darker than 2014’s “My Krazy Life.”

Breaking: Joey Purp

The Chicago rapper is ready to join his Save Money cohort in the spotlight with his official debut mixtape, “iiiDrops.”

Who Cares About Becky with the Good Hair?

To make “Lemonade” all about her potential marital troubles is to once again yoke Beyoncé’s success to her husband—and to stay mired in the madness that this album was built to expose and transcend.

Kendrick Lamar, “untitled unmastered.”

And then it simply—as simply as the most respected, volatile voice in rap could have it be—existed.

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, “This Unruly Mess I’ve Made”

Yes, we know you’re asking us, Macklemore. But this isn’t about you.

Kanye West, “The Life of Pablo”

Kanye West’s God Complex is finally complete.

Pusha T, “King Push – Darkest Before Dawn: The Prelude”

Is Pusha T the greatest rapper alive?

Kendrick Lamar, “To Pimp a Butterfly”

Wracked with pain and pride, sadness and grossness, Kendrick Lamar’s third album doesn’t just sound vital—it takes his entrepreneurial spirit, spits it with a dowel, and lets it turn over and over, for eighty minutes over some quietly building fire.

Breaking: Viet Cong

Matt Flegel discusses the band’s beginnings with last year’s “Cassette”, avoiding the post-punk pigeonhole, and the deconstructed bleakness of their new self-titled record.

Ghostface Killah, “36 Seasons”

And so, 36 Seasons chronicles Ghost’s return to Staten Island, where he must take on the role of vigilante to save his ’hood from corruption.

Wu-Tang Clan, “A Better Tomorrow”

It’s been twenty-one years since 36 Chambers, and the Wu-Tang Clan are still catching up.

TV on the Radio, “Seeds”

Seeds is a record made by four men winnowing their crafts to their immediate cores.

Ex Cops, “Daggers”

The duo would prefer their insanely catchy electro-pop existed in a time when kids still recorded mixtapes off the radio and those lyrics were acceptable—but they don’t.

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