Articles by Jamie Lawlor

Muse, “Simulation Theory”

With “Simulation Theory,” one wonders if Matt Bellamy realizes he’s literally last in line for this year’s retrofuturism trend.

Lil Wayne, “Tha Carter V”

It was always easy to view Lil Wayne as another narcissistic capitalist, bragging his way into superstardom, but now we know the real story.

St. Lucia, “Hyperion”

Remarkable as St. Lucia’s ability to traverse time remains, 2013 still seems like their most urgent destination.

Drake, “Scorpion”

Drake has brilliantly portrayed fatherhood from the perspective of an abandoned child—but now that he is the estranged father, his music feels cold, distant, and distracted.

The Grounded Otherworldliness of serpentwithfeet

The geographies, childhood memories, and necessary failures that tilled the earth for Josiah Wise to build on.

Arctic Monkeys, “Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino”

Arctic Monkeys’ long-awaited returns is built like a Ridley Scott film—foreboding the bleakest of futures, yet you still want to step inside and join the resistance. 

The Voidz, “Virtue”

Impending doom is a theme on “Virtue,” whose title invokes that which seems to be lost in today’s musical climate.

MGMT, “Little Dark Age”

MGMT’s fourth LP marks a return to concise synth pop after their intermittent phases of indulgent psych-rock.

Miguel, “War & Leisure”

With “War & Leisure,” Miguel has solidified a sound that contextualizes past efforts.

Björk, “Utopia”

Björk’s utopia is not born without pain.

Getting Donuts in Outer Space with Midnight Sister

Fringe representatives of LA, the Jagjaguwar signees are building their own planet right here on Earth.

Miley Cyrus, “Younger Now”

Shouldn’t we expect much, much more from one of the world’s most powerful cultural influencers?

Foo Fighters, “Concrete and Gold”

“Concrete and Gold” tries its hardest to escape the inevitable, but still cements Foo Fighters in the past-their-prime phase.

Vic Mensa, “The Autobiography”

Mensa’s debut finds him more musically focused and intellectually connective than ever, but his apparent urge to be Common and Justin Bieber at the same time still wears on his content.

JAY-Z, “4:44”

Struggling to relate to his fans and with his infidelity exposed, Shawn Carter was left with one option: Kill Jay Z.

SZA, “Ctrl”

There’s no Nicki Minaj feature, no DJ Mustard club cruncher, no junk-food love songs; it’s great pop without the guilty pleasure factor.

Radiohead, “OK Computer OKNOTOK 1997 2017”

Imagine if twenty years ago, Radiohead had pulled a Green Album.

Algiers, “The Underside of Power”

Rock history proves that if you’re going to try and awaken the world with a new message, you’d better wake them up with new sounds, too.

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