Articles by Josh Hurst

Eleanor Friedberger, “Rebound”

Friedberger has crafted an album of contoured melodies and steely precision.

Janelle Monáe, “Dirty Computer”

Every generation needs its own soundtrack for kicking against the pricks, and Monáe delivers one here.

Willie Nelson, “Last Man Standing”

Willie’s addressing his twilight years with a light touch and an amiable chuckle.

The Decemberists, “I’ll Be Your Girl”

They may be the only band around who can make the New Wave sound old-timey.

Yo La Tengo, “There’s a Riot Going On”

What the indie rock veterans offer is an album’s worth of palate-cleansers—songs of pastoral purity and laid-back reflection.

Caroline Rose, “Loner”

“Loner” could rightly be called a feminist album or simply a human one, weaponizing empathy in an age of despair.

SHIRT, “Pure Beauty”

SHIRT comes across as a battle rapper; he blazes through “Pure Beauty” in a blur of shit-talking and chest-puffing.

Hollie Cook, “Vessel of Love”

“Vessel of Love” feels modest and small-scale—the work of a self-possessed singer who’s inspired by tradition but never beholden to it.

tUnE-yArDs, “I can feel you creep into my private life”

Merrill Garbus’s latest LP doubles down on hooks and polished mainstream sheen without actually jettisoning any of her quirks or peculiarities.

Exchanging Ideas with The JuJu

Nico Segal’s Chicago quartet is exploring what jazz music can and should be in 2017.

U2, “Songs of Experience”

At fifty-seven, Bono remains weirdly obsessed with charting a song on the radio, and hopelessly committed to the idea that rock and roll can still change the world.

Mavis Staples, “If All I Was Was Black”

Mavis Staples isn’t one to brandish a song like a weapon—not when she’s so good at disarmament—and here she aims to melt swords into plowshares through the cosmic force of neighborly love, wild empathy, and intentional optimism.

Kelela, “Take Me Apart”

“Take Me Apart”‘s tension between sleek, modern sound and beating-heart humanity reveals what’s always been great about R&B: that it wears its emotions on its sleeve and provides a conduit for deep feeling.

Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile, “Lotta Sea Lice”

The songs of Barnett and Vile are deliberately gnarled and unkempt, and never sound nearly as fussed-over as they probably are.

Benjamin Clementine, “I Tell a Fly”

On his second album, the Mercury Prize winner is a big star and a total alien on a pilgrimage through hostile lands.

The National, “Sleep Well Beast”

By keeping it low-key, the stakes on The National’s new album somehow seem even higher.

LCD Soundsystem, “American Dream”

Seven years after “This is Happening,” James Murphy remains unparalleled at building slow-burn epics from all the fun bits of his record collection.

Queens of the Stone Age, “Villains”

It’s another great Queens of the Stone Age record that’s simultaneously of a piece with the others and distinct in its character and identity.

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