Articles by Margaret Farrell

The 1975, “A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships”

Finding a balance between joy and self-seriousness, this is the quartet’s finest and most decadent album to date.

The Language Theory of Julia Holter

“Aviary” walks like a duck and talks like a duck, in album terms, anyway, but the more you pay attention, the less it fits in.

Greta Van Fleet, “Anthem of the Peaceful Army”

The music industry, like history, repeats itself, which is why Greta Van Fleet feels deceptively refreshing—at least to talk about.

BROCKHAMPTON, “iridescence”

The American rap group—or boy band, if you ask them—have found the right balance of vulnerability and abrasive freneticism.

Ariana Grande, “Sweetener”

“Sweetener” is a pop remedy for anxiety, while also explicitly detailing its crippling nature.

Ross from Friends, “Family Portrait”

Ross from Friends’ debut indulges in humor and the minutiae of legacy, handling the details with care.

The Internet, “Hive Mind”

“Hive Mind” solidifies The Internet’s sound as a newly formed molecule, sharing skills and attributes like electrons in a covalent bond.

Let’s Eat Grandma Are Wizards of an Everyday Reality

More playful than cannibalistic, Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton want you to join them in the supermarket of their dreams.

Parquet Courts, “Wide Awake!”

Parquet Courts are practicing a kind of self-care: the self-care of rebellion, of questioning, of not taking things at face value.

Tinashe, “Joyride”

Tinashe is confident and proud, but at the end of thirty-six minutes there doesn’t seem to be a clear understanding of who she is.

Frankie Cosmos, “Vessel”

A hodgepodge of contemplations on love at its best and worst.

Dream Wife, “Dream Wife”

Over fortified vocal harmonies, punching rock drum beats, and growling guitars that ring like fire alarms, Dream Wife have conceived a pointed but fun debut.

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