Watts, Friendship, and Humanity: Twenty-Five Years of “Menace II Society”

While often mislabeled as a “Boyz n the Hood” knockoff, the 1993 film’s precision in rendering the American male adolescent experience remains unmatched.

Stop Steering and Start Driving: Ten Years Later, “Speed Racer” Is Still the Best Movie About Agency in the Era of Late Capitalism

On its tenth birthday, let’s look past its genre and appreciate the unrivaled visual flair, debilitatingly honest coming-of-age narrative, and anti-corporate rage of “Speed Racer,” a kids movie.

Announcing FLOOD 8, Available Now for Purchase and Free Download

Our latest print edition is our first-ever double issue, featuring four cover stories—on Jack White, Courtney Barnett, Roy Choi (in conversation with Portugal. The Man), and Kate Berlant and John Early.

Thirty Years Later, “Beetlejuice” Still Jangles with Energy

Regardless of how “Beetlejuice 2” turns out, Tim Burton’s breakthrough is a lively movie about death that stands the test of mold-covered time.

I Always Wanted to Eat Like a Tenenbaum: Celebrating Wes Anderson at Chicago’s Elizabeth Restaurant

The moment the Life Aquatic–inspired dish is delivered, Sigur Rós’ “Starálfur” begins playing.

Hyper-Girlish Sci-Fi and Trump Parallels in Madeleine L’Engle’s “A Wrinkle in Time”

Long before it became a Disney blockbuster, “A Wrinkle in Time” was a book—and Meg Murry a heroine—familiar to brainy girls the world over.

Paul Thomas Anderson, “Phantom Thread,” and The Myths We Create

The director entwines reality and fiction in much of his recent work, and in the process reveals emotional truths that wouldn’t otherwise have come to light.

What “The Big Sick” Teaches Us About Being Young and Chronically Ill

Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani’s film isn’t just about loving your partner.

Meet the FLOOD Festival Guide, Presented by Toyota C-HR

Featuring in-depth stories on Hundred Waters, Buff Monster, Vince Staples, and Demetri Martin, in addition to our picks and tips for this year’s festival slate.

An Ode to Melanin: Making Space for “Brown Girls”

Fatimah Asghar and Sam Bailey’s web series—soon to be adapted by HBO—offers one of the most compelling and honest portrayals of women of color on screens of any size.

A Seat at the Table: “Master of None,” Parents, and Generational Difference

The best episodes of “Master of None”‘s second season aren’t the funniest, or the ones that leave you on the edge of your seat; they’re the ones that are brutally, undeniably, painstakingly real.

Aaron M. Olson of LA Takedown Offers Up His Ten Favorite Film Scores

Wanna see movies of your dreams? Look no further.

Announcing FLOOD 6, Available Now for Purchase and Free Download

In addition to a cover story on “Silicon Valley”’s Thomas Middleditch, our latest print issue also features an extended celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Beastie Boys’ “Check Your Head.”

Asghar Farhadi, Donald Trump, and the Art of Unintended Consequences

“The Salesman,” the latest film from the acclaimed director of “A Separation,” offers a timely portrait of people and places on the verge of collapse­—and an important reminder of the moral power of art.

The Road-to-Ruin Cure

The things that you want are not necessarily the things that are good.

Leia Shot First: Saying Goodbye to Carrie Fisher

“My generation was not tainted by the fantasy of Leia, but rather encouraged to aspire to the love of women like her.”

Poverty on Television: “Shameless” and the American Dream

The Showtime drama, which was just renewed for an eighth season, offers a brutally humanizing portrayal of lower-class American life.

Make Stars Hollow Great Again: The Unsettlingly Relevant Political Reality of “Gilmore Girls”

Behind the blur of words and scrim of melodrama, Amy Sherman-Palladino’s beloved series shows us a buffoonish tyrant at work.

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