Molly Burch, “Please Be Mine”

The LA native’s debut is an escape route from Trump’s America into an alternative and rose-tinted reality.

The Menzingers, “After the Party”

The four members of The Menzingers have all hit their thirties. “After the Party” confronts that reality and all the realizations that come along with it.

Hand Habits, “Wildly Idle (Humble Before the Void)”

There is an airy, homemade weirdness to Meg Duffy’s solo debut.

Max Richter, “Three Worlds: Music from Woolf Works”

The British composer bravely journeys deep into the interior of Virginia Woolf’s novels and her inimitable characters.

Syd, “Fin”

Syd Fin COLUMBIA 8/10 Some would attribute the melding of hip-hop and R&B into today’s dominant party music to producer Teddy Riley’s new jack swing….

Quelle Chris, “Being You Is Great, I Wish I Could Be You More Often”

“Being You” is gnarly and cerebral, the sound of a jittery headspace that’s got room enough for every flight of fancy.

Cloud Nothings, “Life Without Sound”

On their latest LP, the Cleveland band have realized—or stumbled upon—something lush and lovely.

Mind Over Mirrors, “Undying Color”

While so often synthesizer music seeks to make the listener feel weightless, Jaime Fennelly finds beauty in binding, securing forces.

Moon Duo, “Occult Architecture Vol. 1”

The dexterity with which Moon Duo present seemingly simple riffs belies the complexity of the songwriting—and the difficulty in getting to their destination.

Ty Segall, “Ty Segall”

Ty Segall’s second self-titled album serves as an excellent primer of his career to date—but then again he always is a trickster at heart.

Sampha, “Process”

Sampha’s debut is a record with broad appeal and precise vision; a record where listeners can find themselves but also where they’ll spot the auteur’s hand if they really care to look for it.

Cate Le Bon, “Rock Pool” [EP]

Le Bon’s music lives in an alternate universe—one that’s nearly identical to ours, but laden with a persistent feeling of anxiety.

Kehlani, “SweetSexySavage”

The Oakland singer continues her ascent up through the R&B hierarchy.

Foxygen, “Hang”

“Hang” feels like a dramatic work in eight parts—a vaudeville act about Hollywood and the bastardized Manifest Destiny that it’s created.

Priests, “Nothing Feels Natural”

Priests’s debut full-length feels like a natural extension of the DC band’s early EPs while simultaneously pushing the band’s sound forward.

Avec le soleil sortant de sa bouche, “Pas pire pop, I Love You So Much”

On their second album, the Montreal quartet drill deep into the concept of groove.

Shintaro Sakamoto, “Love If Possible”

Sakamoto leans on the pedal steel as an ambient vessel, spiraling lines around spines of melodic, moody bass.

Bonobo, “Migration”

Leaning somewhat away from trip-hop and toward the more ambient stimuli of his surroundings, Simon Green sounds like he’s in transition, captured between two established ecosystems.

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