Carly Rae Jepsen, “Dedicated”

It’s fun, it’s frivolous, it’s insightful.

The National, “I Am Easy to Find”

There are fewer layers, less fireworks; every part coalesces quietly.

Mac DeMarco, “Here Comes the Cowboy”

The singer-songwriter notes that he’s long been fascinated with the cowboy mythos, which captures both the freedom and the solitude of life on the great open frontier.

Vampire Weekend, “Father of the Bride”

This is Vampire Weekend’s “White Album”—all its baroque catchiness and experimentation in one not-so-neat double LP package.

The Cranberries, “In the End”

There is a haunted quality to any music released after the person who created it is no longer counted among the living.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard, “Fishing for Fishies”

The record is kind of fascinating in its obsession with the “boogie”—both as a verb and as a musical genre.

Anderson .Paak, “Ventura”

Paak isn’t making bad songs, but his adherence to formula is beginning to define him.

FLOOD ESSENTIALS: MARCH 2019 featuring Tame Impala, Lizzo, SASAMI, and More

In our opinion, these were the new tunes worth your while during the first month of spring.

Iron & Wine, “Our Endless Numbered Days (Deluxe Edition)”

“Our Endless Numbered Days” houses many of the most elegant, striking songs of Sam Beam’s career.

Karen O & Danger Mouse, “Lux Prima”

Despite its flawless production, “Lux Prima” is a noticeably restrained affair, considering what a feral creature Karen O has always been.

Weezer, “Weezer (Black Album)”

Try as he might to sound brash and nonchalant, Rivers Cuomo still comes across like the goofball nerd that he is.

Curtis Mayfield, “Keep On Keeping On: Curtis Mayfield Studio Albums 1970-1974”

Attempts to unpack the legacy of one of Chicago’s favorite sons could veer into a novel-length investigation—but an overview of what made him an essential voice is on Technicolor display here.

Sir Babygirl, “Crush on Me”

Debut album “Crush on Me” explores maturity, queer identity, and how it all relates to the frosted pink, hardcore world we live in.

Czarface x Ghostface Killah, “Czarface Meets Ghostface”

A twelve-track saga loaded with menacing beats and ’90-style boom-bap flows.

The Lemonheads, “Varshons 2”

Dando has a keen ear and an encyclopedic knowledge of recorded music, and the selection of songs here spans decades and genres.

Xiu Xiu, “Girl with Basket of Fruit”

The level of pandemonium and desperation here makes for deeply unsettling but fascinatingly involved listening.

Bob Mould, “Sunshine Rock”

“Sunshine Rock” is bedazzled with literal bells and whistles, including an eighteen-piece string section to lend Mould’s muscular rock a sense of transcendence.

Girlpool, “What Chaos Is Imaginary”

While Girlpool’s last album was sugary indie pop-punk, their new one paints in broader strokes.

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