Tag: Above The Current

Curtis Mayfield, “Keep On Keeping On: Curtis Mayfield Studio Albums 1970-1974”

Attempts to unpack the legacy of one of Chicago’s favorite sons could veer into a novel-length investigation—but an overview of what made him an essential voice is on Technicolor display here.

Bob Mould, “Sunshine Rock”

“Sunshine Rock” is bedazzled with literal bells and whistles, including an eighteen-piece string section to lend Mould’s muscular rock a sense of transcendence.

Jessica Pratt, “Quiet Signs”

Pratt’s melodies hold nary a wasted chord or unwanted phrase.

Eerie Wanda, “Pet Town”

Much of the album sounds like echoes in an empty room, with percussion provided by hand claps and a drum machine.

Better Oblivion Community Center, “Better Oblivion Community Center”

“Better Oblivion Community Center” is a folk rock album that proves Conor Oberst and Phoebe Bridgers to be perfect singing companions.

Buzzcocks, “Another Music in a Different Kitchen” / “Love Bites”  [reissues]

Buzzcocks’ first two records with Pete Shelley proved that the band could—and did—maintain dramatic and thematic tension through entire song cycles.

Steve Gunn, “The Unseen in Between”

Steve Gunn’s latest has more palpable emotion and literary bent than ever before.

Sharon Van Etten, “Remind Me Tomorrow”

It’s a fascinating bridge from the moody indie pop of Van Etten’s previous efforts to something a bit thornier, denser, more rewarding.

Pearls Before Swine, “Balaklava”

Pearls Before Swine’s quasi-historical mystery album is hard to grasp, its songs coming in waves of breath and snippets of sound.

The 1975, “A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships”

Finding a balance between joy and self-seriousness, this is the quartet’s finest and most decadent album to date.

The Beatles, “The Beatles (White Album) Super Deluxe Edition”

If not for the fissure amongst the Beatles’ ranks, the lustrous brilliance and weird experimentalism of this collection wouldn’t shine so bright fifty years later.

Thom Yorke, “Suspiria”

Thom Yorke’s soundtrack is that rarest of beasts: music for a cinematic work that can stand on its own.

R.E.M., “At the BBC”

R.E.M. is one the best bands that America has ever produced, and, appropriately, “At the BBC” is an embarrassment of riches.

Elvis Costello & the Imposters, “Look Now”

Even if it’s pitched as a continuation of earlier works, “Look Now” never feels like a rehash.

Fucked Up, “Dose Your Dreams”

This is easily Fucked Up’s most conceptually scattered record, but that’s also what gives it its charm.

Adrianne Lenker, “abysskiss”

Lenker’s haunting vocal acrobatics will linger with you long after the album is done.

Cat Power, “Wanderer”

“Wanderer” is a triumph of raw emotion, old direction, and new meaning. 

Joe Strummer, “Joe Strummer 001”

This new set of rarities unleashes Strummer’s passion into the world in a small but concentrated dose, while honing in on his adoration of American mythology.

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