Tag: Above The Current

Bob Dylan, “Travelin’ Thru, Featuring Johnny Cash: The Bootleg Series Vol. 15”

Dylan revered the outlaw Cash, and Cash admired the wordsmith Dylan.

FKA Twigs, “MAGDALENE”

A deeply wounded album that strengthens the steely fusion of trip-hop and R&B she mastered on her debut.

Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, “Ghosteen”

Nick Cave moves across his most lush and lovely melodies yet in a voice that burrows deeper than ever before.

Wilco, “Ode to Joy”

Jeff Tweedy’s relative calm in the face of turmoil is the defining force underlying the record.

The Roots, “Things Fall Apart” 20th Anniversary Reissue

A record that still “sparks shit” today.

Lana Del Rey, “Norman Fucking Rockwell!”

A cool, cutting chronicler of all things California. 

Sleater-Kinney, “The Center Won’t Hold”

They remain faithfully yours in taut, ruthless, uncompromising rock and roll.

Bon Iver, “i,i”

Central to it all is a Justin Vernon with an altered disposition, more confident and looser—at times, he even sounds content.

Sigur Rós, “Ágætis Byrjun 20th Anniversary Edition”

Indefinable, refined, and weirdly universal.

Thom Yorke, “Anima”

“Anima” goes to great lengths to differentiate itself from Radiohead’s oeuvre.

Tyler, the Creator, “IGOR”

The heart of “IGOR” deals with lust and obsession—a spectrum of desire requiring listeners to think long and hard about the reality of a relationship.

The National, “I Am Easy to Find”

There are fewer layers, less fireworks; every part coalesces quietly.

Iron & Wine, “Our Endless Numbered Days (Deluxe Edition)”

“Our Endless Numbered Days” houses many of the most elegant, striking songs of Sam Beam’s career.

Curtis Mayfield, “Keep On Keeping On: Curtis Mayfield Studio Albums 1970-1974”

Attempts to unpack the legacy of one of Chicago’s favorite sons could veer into a novel-length investigation—but an overview of what made him an essential voice is on Technicolor display here.

Bob Mould, “Sunshine Rock”

“Sunshine Rock” is bedazzled with literal bells and whistles, including an eighteen-piece string section to lend Mould’s muscular rock a sense of transcendence.

Jessica Pratt, “Quiet Signs”

Pratt’s melodies hold nary a wasted chord or unwanted phrase.

Eerie Wanda, “Pet Town”

Much of the album sounds like echoes in an empty room, with percussion provided by hand claps and a drum machine.

Better Oblivion Community Center, “Better Oblivion Community Center”

“Better Oblivion Community Center” is a folk rock album that proves Conor Oberst and Phoebe Bridgers to be perfect singing companions.

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