Tag: Above The Current

Charly Bliss, “Guppy”

Charly Bliss’s Eva Hendricks makes Letters to Cleo’s Kay Hanley sound like Eddie Vedder.

Yorkston/Thorne/Khan, “Neuk Wight Delhi All-Stars”

On their second LP, the Scottish/English/Indian trio of guitarist James Yorkston, double bassist Jon Thorne, and sarangi player Suhail Yusuf Khan demonstrate a subtle mastery of fusion.

Joey Bada$$, “All-Amerikkkan Bada$$”

Any art that pours out of social criticism is an attempt at reorganizing society, and all Joey Bada$$ wants is for his country to respect black lives.

Guided by Voices, “August by Cake”

“August by Cake” is an album stuffed with songs that qualify as demos, half-baked ideas, and snippets, along with a handful of brilliant gems nestled in between.

Future Islands, “The Far Field”

“The Far Field,” much like Future Islands albums that preceded it, is a deeply romantic album.

Jessi Colter, “THE PSALMS”

Colter creates music that drones, builds, drifts, and crests, never following familiar emotional beats but instead allowing them to follow their own wild intuitions.

Craig Finn, “We All Want the Same Things”

A more than welcome addition to—and expansion of—the Hold Steady frontman’s catalog.

Hurray for the Riff Raff, “The Navigator”

Alynda Lee Segarra simply wants, like we all do, to be something.

Spiral Stairs, “Doris & the Daggers”

With family life firmly in the picture, head screwed on correctly, and rangy Pavement life behind him, Scott Kannberg has delivered his strongest album-length statement.

Chicano Batman, “Freedom Is Free”

The LA quartet has crafted one of the most pleasurable sounding records you’ll hear this year, the idea of personal liberty permeating the record’s warm grooves.

Gold Star, “Big Blue”

When he’s not sharing stories about strangers, Marlon Rabenreither spills his guts about his own love affairs, breakups, and what it’s like to be all by his lonesome self.

Wire, “Silver/Lead”

The Colin Newman–led band is not the same as it used to be fifteen albums ago. And that’s exactly the point.

Conor Oberst, “Salutations”

“Salutations” maintains the tattered humanity of its unaccompanied counterpart, but somehow makes it all go down a little smoother.

Spoon, “Hot Thoughts”

There was always bound to be a straight-ahead dance-rock album from Spoon. How could there not be?

Ibibio Sound Machine, “Uyai”

There’s a kind of political beauty in the sight of an empowered woman and her band communicating passionately and honestly.

Dirty Projectors, “Dirty Projectors”

“Dirty Projectors” can at times be exhausting, and its density can feel crushing, but at their best, David Longstreth’s songs center on connection.

Grandaddy, “Last Place”

It’s not the second coming of “The Sophtware Slump.” But it also isn’t trying to be.

Entrance, “Book of Changes”

Guy Blakeslee has never really been a wallflower when it comes to singing, but “Book of Changes” showcases his voice in a way that feels like it’s a new thing.

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