Tag: Above The Current

Neil Young + Promise of the Real, “The Visitor”

Shakey’s response to Trump is one that the USA desperately needs.

Björk, “Utopia”

Björk’s utopia is not born without pain.

U2, “Songs of Experience”

At fifty-seven, Bono remains weirdly obsessed with charting a song on the radio, and hopelessly committed to the idea that rock and roll can still change the world.

Charlotte Gainsbourg, “Rest”

Charged with grief and euphoria, “Rest” is a showcase for Charlotte Gainsbourg the musician.

Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings, “Soul of a Woman”

“Soul of a Woman” is full of light and hope, serving as a testament to the beauty of life—and love and friendship and all that good stuff we get to experience in our short time on this planet.

Gun Outfit, “Out of Range”

It’s in the way the hidden reveals itself that Gun Outfit finds its surest footing.

Mavis Staples, “If All I Was Was Black”

Mavis Staples isn’t one to brandish a song like a weapon—not when she’s so good at disarmament—and here she aims to melt swords into plowshares through the cosmic force of neighborly love, wild empathy, and intentional optimism.

Spoon, “Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga” [10th Anniversary Reissue]

“Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga” is the logical conclusion of Spoon’s commercial appeal and their innovativeness, an effort seamlessly weaving between earworm melodies and genuine experimentation.

John Maus, “Screen Memories”

As time marches violently on, John Maus is seeming less and less a bursting aggro-eccentric and more and more the sane elder dwelling at the end of the hall.

R.E.M., “Automatic for the People” (25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition)

Sometimes, a reissue of a classic album can reveal too much of the process. With “Automatic for the People,” the opposite is the case.

Hüsker Dü, “Savage Young Dü”

The reissue tells a story of teens from Saint Paul, Minnesota, finding themselves and their searing, rock-out identities.

Julien Baker, “Turn Out the Lights”

Across all of “Turn Out the Lights,” Baker doesn’t pull a single punch.

King Krule, “The OOZ”

With Archy Marshall, the question was never “if” but rather “when,” and thanks to “The OOZ,” the answer is firmly “now.”

Circuit des Yeux, “Reaching for Indigo”

Though it’s her most accessible album to date, “Reaching for Indigo” continues in Haley Fohr’s mission of experimentalism and self-expression.

The Meters, “A Message from the Meters”

Anyone with even a passing interest in beats, party vibes, “in the pocket” grooves, or ecstatic dancing needs to breathe this music in like the fresh air it is. 

Beck, “Colors”

Beck is fully embracing his talent for making the kind of music you want to dance to. What’s so bad about that?

Kelela, “Take Me Apart”

“Take Me Apart”‘s tension between sleek, modern sound and beating-heart humanity reveals what’s always been great about R&B: that it wears its emotions on its sleeve and provides a conduit for deep feeling.

Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile, “Lotta Sea Lice”

The songs of Barnett and Vile are deliberately gnarled and unkempt, and never sound nearly as fussed-over as they probably are.

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