The Staple Singers, “Come Go With Me: The Stax Collection”

Looking for a consolidated history of soul music in one handy package?

Khruangbin & Leon Bridges, “Texas Sun” EP

A show of unity between Texan soul makers.

Destroyer, “Have We Met”

In many ways, a classic Destroyer record: cavernous and twisty and rich with atmosphere.

TORRES, “Silver Tongue”

Mackenzie Scott has always been a sharp and economical lyricist with a variety of personas at her disposal.

Son Little, “aloha”

The narrative behind Aaron Livingston’s third full-length as Son Little is one of relinquished control.

Halsey, “Manic”

It’s all so calculatedly quirky that you almost wonder if Pee-wee Herman wasn’t called in as a consultant.

Miles Davis, “The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions”

The sessions that fill this box are those where Davis left flirty, speedy bebop behind for slow, hard bop.

Harry Styles, “Fine Line”

Styles has a way of making music with plenty of discernible references, yet it somehow emerges as era-less.

Prince, “1999 (Deluxe Edition, Remastered)”

Like the gluttonous Reagan era in which it was born, the new “1999” is explosively opulent and appropriate for the Trump moment in its excess and mess.

Leonard Cohen, “Thanks for the Dance”

In some ways, it’s more like Adam Cohen’s love letter to his father’s artistry than a final statement from the late poet.

Beck, “Hyperspace”

It’s not exactly a Beck album without precedent; but maybe at this point, that’s asking too much.

Bob Dylan, “Travelin’ Thru, Featuring Johnny Cash: The Bootleg Series Vol. 15”

Dylan revered the outlaw Cash, and Cash admired the wordsmith Dylan.

FKA Twigs, “MAGDALENE”

A deeply wounded album that strengthens the steely fusion of trip-hop and R&B she mastered on her debut.

Neil Young and Crazy Horse, “Colorado”

While most legacy rockers are hitting the road rather than bothering to write new music, Young refuses to stop inventing.

Freddie Mercury, “Never Boring” Box Set

While the original albums sounded surprisingly grey, this curation of solo output is hotly in-the-red, remixed and boldly remastered.

Kim Gordon, “No Home Record”

Kim’s dissatisfaction with and aggression toward toxic American capitalism are burned into this album.

Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, “Ghosteen”

Nick Cave moves across his most lush and lovely melodies yet in a voice that burrows deeper than ever before.

Wilco, “Ode to Joy”

Jeff Tweedy’s relative calm in the face of turmoil is the defining force underlying the record.

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