Articles by Mischa Pearlman

Mogwai, “As the Love Continues”

While the amusement value of the track list is high, the music lags behind at times.

God Is an Astronaut, “Ghost Tapes #10”

This is the sound of a band burrowing deep into the heart of its genre, ripping it apart and reviving.

The Drives’ “The Comedown” Offers a Little Optimism Even as It Acknowledges the Hurt

The LA rockers kick off 2021 with an upbeat—though emotionally complex—single.

Speed Stick, “Volume One”

The debut from the avant-garde supergroup demonstrates the power of collaboration, but struggles with cohesion and emotional drive.

The Dirty Nil, “Fuck Art”

The Canadian punks’ pugnacious third LP is also their most tender and nuanced release yet.

Emma Ruth Rundle & Thou, “The Helm of Sorrow”

The doomy pair share more mournful explosions of existential tragedy and aggressive solemnity that transcend genre.

The Kills, “Little Bastards”

This B-sides comp demonstrates the one-dimensionality at the heart of the rock duo’s two-decade career.

The Coathangers, “The Coathangers” (Deluxe Edition)

The Atlanta garage rockers’ debut is the sound of four women who don’t give a damn for convention or perception.

The War on Drugs, “Live Drugs”

The songs on the group’s first live album sound more lush and textured than they do on their recorded counterparts.

Soul Glo, “Songs to Yeet at the Sun”

At under 12 minutes, the Philly hardcore band all punch hard while documenting what it’s like to be a Black band in a white scene.

Jeremiah Sand, “Lift It Down”

The “Mandy” tie-in record convincingly blurs the line between truth and fiction with songs that, on their own merits, are actually pretty cool.

Jónsi, “Shiver”

While its experimental attitude should be applauded, “Shiver” is at its best when Jonsí tiptoes across familiar ground.

Osees, “Protean Threat”

These 13 tracks are as oddball and incohesive as should be expected from the California band.

Stream Overo and Asthenia’s New Split 7-Inch

In lieu of their planned Japanese tour, Houston’s Overo and Tokyo’s Asthenia share four new songs.

Throwing Muses, “Sun Racket”

“Sun Racket” finds frontwoman Kristin Hersh on her trademark fine and fiery form.

Old Kerry McKee Embraces His Project’s Chaotic Old-Timey Energy in “Cattle and Wolves” Video

The new video from the Swedish blues/death-metal musician feels perfectly on-brand.

In Conversation: Bright Eyes Persevere on “Down in the Weeds, Where the World Once Was”

Conor Oberst, Mike Mogis, and Nate Walcott discuss how picking up where they left off in 2011 has been a source of comfort for them.

Jason Molina, “Eight Gates”

There’s a real sense of dread and foreboding in the posthumous record’s dark sinews.

In Conversation: Joe Casey Discusses Protomartyr’s Latest Attempt at a “Happy” Album

The Detroit post-punk group’s fifth album “Ultimate Success Today” is out this Friday.

No Age, “Goons Be Gone”

The LA duo’s fifth record is full of weird and unexpected twists and turns.

Built to Spill, “Plays the Songs of Daniel Johnston”

The sheer scope of Johnston’s talent shines brightly on Built to Spill’s album-length homage.

PREMIERE: Plasma Canvas Revisit 2 a.m. Phone Calls on “Saturn”

The Fort Collins punks share the latest single from their forthcoming EP “KILLERMAJESTIC.”

Woods, “Strange to Explain”

“Strange to Explain” is a confused swirl of hope, wonder, and melancholy.

In Conversation: Brian Fallon Wants to Recharge You with “Local Honey”

The ex-Gaslight Anthem frontman on leaving his label, therapy, and what Bruce Springsteen told him about writing political songs.

Phantogram Go Back to the Beginning on “Ceremony”

Sarah Barthel and Josh Carter discuss their move to LA, new album, and longtime bond.

In Conversation: Refused’s Dennis Lyxzén Is Still Writing War Music

Lyxzén discusses the politics of the Swedish post-hardcore band’s second new album since 1998’s classic Shape of Punk to Come.

The New Era of Boogarins

The Brazilian psychedelic band discusses “Soumbrou Dúvida” and the benefits of working with a professional engineer.

The New Colossus Festival Isn’t Interested in Your Big Headliners

A new Lower East Side music fest is looking to do what CMJ (R.I.P.) and SXSW used to—focus on up-and-coming bands.

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