Articles by Lydia Pudzianowski

Pearl Jam, “Gigaton”

Where “Lightning Bolt” was solid but stagnant, “Gigaton” is (ironically) more electric, a living, breathing thing giving off sparks.

Alex Cameron, “Miami Memory”

Though he spent his last two albums examining despicable male characters, this one spotlights and elevates women.

The Lemonheads, “Varshons 2”

Dando has a keen ear and an encyclopedic knowledge of recorded music, and the selection of songs here spans decades and genres.

Eerie Wanda, “Pet Town”

Much of the album sounds like echoes in an empty room, with percussion provided by hand claps and a drum machine.

The Smashing Pumpkins, “Shiny and Oh So Bright, Vol. 1 / LP: No Past. No Future. No Sun.”

There’s nary a bad vibe to found here, despite all the ragin’ and cagin’ promised by the angsty title.

R.E.M., “At the BBC”

R.E.M. is one the best bands that America has ever produced, and, appropriately, “At the BBC” is an embarrassment of riches.

GØGGS, “Pre Strike Sweep”

“Pre Strike Sweep” is a fireball of an album, blistering from start to finish.

Spider Bags, “Someday Everything Will Be Fine”

No matter who Spider Bags sort of sound like, they always sound like themselves.

The Ophelias, “Almost”

“Almost” is the sound of women comparing notes in the spotlight to create something unusual, beautiful, and wholly relatable.

Andy Jenkins, “Sweet Bunch”

While the album feels appropriate for relaxed, sun-kissed porch listening, it is by no means lazy.

Liz Phair, “Girly-Sound to Guyville: The 25th Anniversary Box Set”

Liz Phair’s debut remains exactly as relatable, smart, and genuine in 2018 as it was in 1993.

Hinds, “I Don’t Run”

Hinds created this record with an agenda—theirs, not yours.

Lucy Dacus, “Historian”

Where her first album was an exploration, this one is a proclamation.

Sunita Mani Defies Comfort Zones

From stilt-walking to viral rap videos, your guess as to where the “GLOW” star will appear next is as good as ours.

Bat Fangs, “Bat Fangs”

Bat Fangs’s “Bat Fangs” marries hair metal and garage rock, equal parts campy and true.

Lived Through That: A Conversation with Hole’s Patty Schemel

The iconic grunge drummer talks about her recent memoir, “Hit So Hard,” and the turbulent years of sex, drugs, and loss that inspired it.

Salad Boys, “This Is Glue”

On “This Is Glue,” much is made of direction and being on the edge of somewhere, a part of something larger. Salad Boys are growing up and getting restless.

Boulevards, “Hurtown, USA”

We’ve all lived in Hurtown, USA, and this album is reason enough to go back.

Duds, “Of a Nature or Degree”

This is spare, nervy music with no strings attached. It’s almost refreshing.

Alex Cameron, “Forced Witness”

The characters on “Forced Witness,” Alex Cameron’s second record, make the sociopaths from his debut look like amateurs.

EMA, “Exile in the Outer Ring”

“Exile in the Outer Ring” is a dispatch from a Midwestern woman trying not to fall into the traps of fear and paranoia set for her and her fellow Americans.

Mr. Lif and Akrobatik (The Perceptionists), “Resolution”

“Resolution” is the result of the newfound balance in Mr. Lif and Akrobatik’s lives as they devote their attention to love and to justice equally.

Frankie Rose, “Cage Tropical”

If you were to say that the whole package sounds like a sad time in Los Angeles, you’d be dead on.

Dent May, “Across the Multiverse”

When times get tough, it’s easy to check out. It’s harder to be present. Dent May gets it.

Manchester Orchestra, “A Black Mile to the Surface”

The Atlanta group’s latest is a next step that feels fitting for them.

I Got So Much Magic, You Can Have It: How the Near West Side Was Won at Pitchfork Fest

Solange, Angel Olsen, Kamaiyah, and a host of brilliant female artists took over Chicago’s Union Park this weekend.

Pill, “Aggressive Advertising” [EP]

Brooklyn punks Pill released their excellent first LP, “Convenience,” last summer, and lucky for us, they haven’t slowed down since then.

She-Devils, “She-Devils”

The Montreal duo keep a careful balance of weirdness and sweetness across their self-titled debut.

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